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New pattern: the Aldaia Dress

aldaia dress

I’m so glad to finally introduce the new pattern: the Aldaia dress! I’ve been working on it for the past 3 months and was waiting for the Paris fair to release it.

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View A: cotton spandex jersey – Girl Charlee Fabrics UK

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View B: knit fabric – Henry & Henriette (not available – similar here)

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View C: ponte milano – local shop (similar to Cousette)

Inside the Aldaia dress pattern, you’ll find 3 different views and you’ll be able to combine the sleeves, necklines and skirts options for a total of 27 different dresses! Yes, 27 dresses in 1 pattern! As I started with the Aldaia design, I kept adding possible modifications and I thought it would be great to have them directly added to the pattern.
This pattern is designed exclusively for knit fabrics: you’ll need between 20% and 30% stretch (I’ll come back in the next days with a tutorial on how to check the stretch and some tutorials on how to sew with jersey fabrics). You can use fabrics like cotton jersey, rayon jersey, neoprene, french terry… and my favourite ponte milano!
As for sewing the Aldaia dress, you won’t need anything special: if you have an overlocker, perfect. If you don’t, don’t worry, you can sew the whole dress with your sewing machine.
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The Aldaia dress pattern uses the same bodice base for all 3 views but has many options.
  • View A has a V-neck, elbow-length sleeves and a short skirt with panels (great for colorblocking).
  • View B is sleeveless, with a faux wrap neckline and an elegant knee-length skirt.
  • As for view C, this is the more playful design of the 3 with it’s round neckline, short sleeves and full 6-gore skirt.

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The 27 different options…

And as I’ve said before, feel free to mix’n match the options: how about a wrap bodice (view B) with short sleeves (view C) and short skirt (view A)? Anything’s possible!

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I hope you’ll like this new pattern. You can find the printed and PDF copies in the shop.
Let me know which view is your favourite!
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3 March, 2017 0 comment
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Zoom on: the Safor skirt pattern

Today, let’s talk about the Safor skirt.
Safor skirt view A

safor skirt view B zoom
Ever since making the Rosari skirt pattern, I’ve wanted to add another skirt pattern to the collection. And because I couldn’t decide between a short and casual and a knee-length one for more formal occasion, I chose to make them both.
The Safor skirt is a faux-wrap skirt with a hip yoke that follows nicely the body’s curves. The great thing about the faux-wrap is that you can walk easily without the inconvenience of your skirt opening too high. The Safor skirt is confortable and easy to wear.
View A offers inseam pockets hidden between the yoke and the skirt and is quite short (there are lengthen/shorten lines on the pattern if you want to give a little more length to your skirt). View B is knee-length and has a contrasting panel along the hem. This is a great way to play with colors or fabrics contrasts.
Both views have the same asymetrical fold-over front and close with an inviible zipper and a button at the back.

Safor skirt view A zoom Safor skirt view B

Safor skirt pattern 2 versions

I’ve used Les trouvailles d’Amandine ‘s denim for both versions: in “liane” shade for view A and “etendard” for view B (as it’s reversible, I’ve used the wrong side for contrast). You could also use any medium weight fabric with a little bit of body: denim, linen, gabardine, leather or suede for example.

Let me know if you have any question about the patterns…

23 May, 2016 0 comment
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Isla Trench Coat by Named Patterns

The Fall/Winter collection of Named Patterns came out … well last fall as it’s name indicate. And I remember liking every single pattern. But as I knew ordering more than one was stupid as I would never have time to make them, I just ordered my favourite: the Isla Trench coat. And I’m just about to show it now, 6 months later 😉

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I wanted to make a very traditionnal trench coat (traditionnal in the sense of copying a Burberry one!) so I studied every Burberry trench coat pictures I could find on Pinterest (i even created a special board, check it for details). I went fabric shopping for some beige gabardine and tartan checked lining, which was more difficult than I thought first. In the end, my gabardine is slightly lighter in colour than desired but it’s ok. I found all the fabrics and material (buttons and belt loops) at my local fabric shop. I will admit that it was quite an expensive coat to make: the printed pattern was 22 € (+ 8€ shipping fees so 30 € in total), 3 meters of gabardine at 20€/m, 2 meters of 15€/m lining and about 15€ for the buttons/belt loops, I mean it’s almost a 100€ trench coat. But knowing a real Burberry one retails at least at 1500€, I feel better.

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The gabardine is very nice, a bit on the heavy side so some areas were quite difficult to sew due to the various layers. I didn’t add any interfacing because of the gabardine’s weight. And the lining is a Burberry-like tartan in flannel, which makes it a perfect winter coat for the mild mediterranean weather of Valencia (sleeves are lined in rayon).

As for the supplies, I chose to change some of the features to get a more Burberry-lookalike coat. I’ve used some metal belt loops and eyelets for the sleeve straps and the belt. I wanted to do the same for the collar stand but instead just shortened it. I also added some epaulettes and made the under collar out of checked lining.

Isla-trench-coat-named-patterns-5For the pattern itself, I made some changes mostly due to my petite size: I had to shorten the body about 30 cm and the sleeves by about 10 cm (fyi I’m 1m55 tall , 5ft1). The instructions were very complete but I wouldn’t recommand this pattern for a beginner (which Named patterns doesn’t either, the pattern is marked 5/5 and challenging). There are a lot of pieces and the construction has to be very detailed and meticulous. But the results are very professional looking. The only complaint I have is just some personal preference: I like to cut my pattern directly in the paper but I could n’t do it as the numerous pieces are layered on top of each other so I had to trace them first.

I’m still not sure I attached the lining at the back vent correctly but it looks ok. It was the fist time I had to line a back vent, I even left the trench unfinished for about 4 months before going back to finish the lining. I finally figured it out and that’s why I’m showing it only now (started in november and finished in march, that’s my longest project!)

For the rest, everything fits together nicely, the construction order is great and the fit is good.

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I’ve been wearing the Isla trench coat for about a month now and I really like it. My favourite thing about it? When the wind blows and the pretty tartan lining peeps out!

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26 April, 2016 24 comments
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Inspiration behind the New Patterns…

The new patterns are at the printer right now and I’m really looking forward to receive them!
In the mean time, I’ll show you the inspiration behind the “collection”.

Inspired by travel, the models are both chic and comfortable. Cruise or safari, which one is your style?

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Moodboard: pinterestFabrics: les trouvailles d’Amandine
Can’t wait to release the collection!!!

 

22 April, 2016 15 comments
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Birkin Flares
I’ve made jeans! Like real jeans! I’m very excited about that as buying jeans has always been so frustating for me. I own only 2 pairs of jeans, one skinny and one boyfriend (very loose!). The issue for me when buying jeans is the following: I’m short, only 1m55 (5 ft 1) so I always have to cut about 25 – 30 cm (10″ or 11″) to the hem, which change completely the shape of the jeans. Also I like high rise (mainly at the back) and most of the jeans available are really low rise – which makes it difficult to bent without showing my underwear – or worse…
And finally, I’m not fan of the skinny shape. And this is the only shape I find at the stores.

 

So when I saw the Birkin Flares by Baste & Gather, I was delighted and so excited to make them.About the pattern: It’s great! It has all the details of a store bought jeans, with a nice fit (more on that later) and the instructions are really good and easy to follow.
So the fit… It would be great if I had chosen the right size for me. Next time I’ll go up a size. I don’t think they run small, I think I made a mistake when choosing the size. The legs are a bit too tight for me (you can see the crotch lines) but I could wear them like that. The problem is with the waistband. I can wear the jeans only when standing up 😉 If i sit or bend down a little bit, the waistband cuts into my stomach.
I’ll call them my practice jeans!

 

The denim I used is really nice, it has 2% elasthan which makes it really comfortable. I bought it online at the Sweet Mercerie. As I didn’t find any rivets locally, I didn’t add them. That would be a nice detail but I don’t really feel like paying the extra cost of shipping them here.I hope to show you the second version very soon…

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4 February, 2016 32 comments
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Xerea Dress Pattern
xerea-dress-pattern-sewing-1Today let’s talk about the perfect summer dress:  the Xerea Dress. Inspired by the 60’s mini dresses, Xerea is easy to sew and easy to wear!
The pattern is available in two versions: View A is a shift dress with short sleeves and View B a sleeveless tent dress with center box pleat. Both views include pockets at the princess seams.
xerea-dress-pattern-sewing-2Xereaxerea-dress-pattern-sewing-3 is perfect for beginners and will delight advanced (lazy) seamstresses: no zipper, no buttons. The dress is put on easily thanks to the open back neckline, finished with bias binding.
xerea-dress-pattern-sewing-4For fabrics, I would recommend fabrics with some drape, in particular if you choose the shift dress.
For the shift version, View A, I used an ikat cotton (Henry et Henriette) with piping inserted in the princess seams – perfect for summer – and for the tent version, View B,  I used a jersey (Tejidos Paredes – make sure it’s stable enough: for example ponte knit fabric) for a 60’s style.
xerea-dress-pattern-sewing-5xerea-dress-pattern-sewing-6The yoke design allow you to use contrasting fabric very easily: how about color blocking or lace accents? All the hems are finished with bias binding, make your own with matching fabric for an invisible finish or add some subtle contrast to your dress.
This pattern can also transition easily into the colder months: lengthen the sleeves or make view B in woolen fabric to wear as a pinafore over a shirt or pullover.
xerea-dress-pattern-sewing-7I hope you’ll like the new patterns, the Xerea dress and the Sorell trousers!

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11 June, 2015 13 comments
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Quart coat testers’ versions
Thanks do much for your lovely comments about the new pattern, the Quart coat! I can’t wait to see your versions…
But for today, let’s see the Quart coats of some amazing testers. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome:
quart-coat-testers-version-sewing-pattern-1quart-coat-testers-version-sewing-pattern-2Sandra’s beautiful red Quart looks very festive! This is such a great way to brighten a grey Winter.
Read about it (in French) on her blog.
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I absolutely love Manju’s style and her sewing realisations are always so well executed. I am so happy to have her as a tester. Look at that beautiful tweed Quart coat and her bright lining! See more details at SewManju!

 

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Once again, Annie’s pictures are divine, I should definitely ask her to model the patterns for me ;-). Such an amazing classic style and gorgeous coat. Read about her Quart coat (again in French) at her blog.
Have a wonderful end of the week!

 

 

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11 December, 2014 19 comments
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Alameda Sew-Along: Style Inspiration

After choosing your fabric for the Alameda dress, let’s see some style inspiration to help you decide how to combine the colours, patterns or different fabrics to get the perfect dress!

You can use contrasting piping (buy it already made or make your own following this tutorial), contrasting panels, mix and match the skirt and top fabrics, go for a day version or a party look… there are so many options!

 

source: 1, 2, 3

Use different colours or patterned and plain fabrics on the different pattern pieces. For example dark colours on the outside will make you waist appear smaller (great visual trick!). And what about making the flounce in leather? With maybe leather piping? Perfect for the rock’n roll chicks.

source: 1, 2, 3

Prints are great! For a nautical look, go for stripes. Want to emulate the Dolce & Gabbana spanish look, polka dots will be your friends. And for the more romantics, florals can never go wrong.

source: 1, 2, 3
The Alameda dress can go from day to night in no time: just choose the right fabric. How about a brocade? And lace would look amazing as well (remember to underline the dress) for a wedding. Bright colours are a favourite of mine. Leave the piping out and add a big bow for fun.
source: 1, 2, 3
Last but not least, a Fall/Winter version in tweed is really elegant. Worn with a cardigan and tights, the Alameda will make a cute dress for work and for going out on the week-end.
I hope this has given you a lot of ideas for your
Alameda. If you have any questions, let me know here in the comments.

 

23 July, 2014 1 comment
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Your Beautiful Carme Blouses – Carme Sew-Along
CARME PARTY!!!
Thank you for sending me links to your blogs or photos of your beautiful Carme blouses! This is amazing to see the different versions you’ve made: we’ve got some prints, some plain fabrics, some contrasting yokes, with or without buttons, different sleeve lengths….
It sure gave me a lot of ideas for my next version ;)And now ladies, it’s your turn to show your gorgeous creations:

Bee Made‘s amazing print fabric is perfect for Spring, don’t you think? What an elegant blouse!

I love Gwendolyn‘s contrasting yoke and her beautiful Nani Iro fabric.

I love Marta‘s pretty blue Carme. The discreet print is lovely and make for a casual yet put together look.

Can you believe this is a muslin? I wouldn’t mind having muslin as pretty as Callimetrie‘s casual Carme 😉

Black and blue look great together, like on SB Creations version.

This fabric looks amazingly comfortable. And the red stitching to pick up the dots on the fabric is genious. Congrats l’Irbis!

Annie Coton‘s version is so pretty. The oiled fabric is a very original touch and the cherry blossoms make the perfect background.

Mary Carmen chose to make a contrasting yoke as well. Her fabric looks great and easy to dree up or down.

Dotted swiss: I dream about Sandra’s version. And as she pointed out, perfect for every situation: from the beach to the office.

Ocni‘s version in black cotton is going to get a lot of wear. So versatile it goes with everything…

What can I say about Blousette coquette‘s Carme? I absolutely love the colour! It’s like the twin sister of my last version, hehe.

Kerry‘s printed voile is so beautiful!  And those details are perfect. I love how she cut the yoke without pleats and on the cross-grain.

I’m overwhelmed to see the amazing reception you reserved to the Carme blouse pattern. THANK YOU so much!!!
If your photo is missing, send me an email and I’ll add it.
And remember that you can get the Carme pattern here: Carme blouse pattern.

I’ll let you know more about the next pattern very soon as it’s being tested right now and about the great news: my patterns will be available on print! You will be able to choose between the PDF downloadable pattern and the printed pattern to be send at your home. More coming soon…

Have a great week!

7 April, 2014 24 comments
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Buttons and buttonholes – Carme Sew-Along
The last step of the Sew-Along! I hope your Carme blouse is looking spectacular!
If you want to find the whole schedule, here it is: Carme Sew-Along schedule.
In a moment we’ll stitch the last details to complete the blouse but before that, I’d like to invite you all to send the pictures of your Carme blouse so we can all enjoy them together here on the blog.
How about that? Send me a picture (or more!) to my email paulineyalice@gmail.com or send me a link to your post if you have a blog. Remember that we also have a Flickr group.
As some of you have started not long ago the Sew-Along, the big Party with all your creations will be on Monday, April 7th! That mean you still have time to join or finish peacefully your blouse 😉
And now, buttons! In this tutorial, I’ll show you where to place the buttons and buttonholes. You’ll not see me actually stitch them because, 1st I didn’t have my buttons at the time, and 2nd my machine makes an automatic buttonhole in 1 step so… not really interesting.
I have seen versions of the Carme blouse with only 2 or 3 buttons on the button placket and that’s a great idea! You’ll probably never wear it buttoned-up so it’s a good way to spare buttons and go for a more relaxed look. I think I’ll do that for my next version…

Thank you so much for following this Sew-Along and I really hope you enjoyed the video tutorials. I know I had fun making them. I’m looking forward to see photos of your Carme!!!

 

 

26 March, 2014 4 comments
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How to sew Sleeves – Carme Sew-Along
First, let’s sart with some beautiful Carme blouses made by two lovely french seamstresses: Annie Coton‘s beautiful dark blue blouse and Sandra’s romantic swiss dot Carme. Please be sure to check their wonderful versions, it will surely inspire you (as well as they amazing blogs, I sure know as I’ve spent sooo much time browsing through their archives and admiring their stylish handmade wardrobe).
Now, let’s talk about the Sew-Along! Today is a big day as we’re going to make the entire sleeve piece. But don’t worry, there are 4 steps but each one is quite easy on its own.
Let’s begin!
SLEEVE VENT

SLEEVE TAB

SLEEVE CUFF

SET THE SLEEVE

I hope the videos are being useful and that you’re not already fed up with the jingle and my broken English (I know I am after editing the videos and watching them so much). I wish a great day and I’ll see you on Friday for the collar part of the Sew-Along.

 

19 March, 2014 4 comments
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French seams – Carme Sew-Along
If you’re like me and don’t have a serger, you might want to use a cleaner finish than zig-zag stitches on your seam allowances. That’s why we’re going to see how to make french seams for the side and shoulder seams (and later on the sleeve seams) to get that nice and clean finishing touch.

 

I’ll see you on Wednesday for the sleeve part!

17 March, 2014 6 comments
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