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pauline alice patterns

Safor skirt pattern 2 versions

Today, let’s talk about the Safor skirt.
Safor skirt view A

safor skirt view B zoom
Ever since making the Rosari skirt pattern, I’ve wanted to add another skirt pattern to the collection. And because I couldn’t decide between a short and casual and a knee-length one for more formal occasion, I chose to make them both.
The Safor skirt is a faux-wrap skirt with a hip yoke that follows nicely the body’s curves. The great thing about the faux-wrap is that you can walk easily without the inconvenience of your skirt opening too high. The Safor skirt is confortable and easy to wear.
View A offers inseam pockets hidden between the yoke and the skirt and is quite short (there are lengthen/shorten lines on the pattern if you want to give a little more length to your skirt). View B is knee-length and has a contrasting panel along the hem. This is a great way to play with colors or fabrics contrasts.
Both views have the same asymetrical fold-over front and close with an inviible zipper and a button at the back.

Safor skirt view A zoom Safor skirt view B

Safor skirt pattern 2 versions

I’ve used Les trouvailles d’Amandine ‘s denim for both versions: in “liane” shade for view A and “etendard” for view B (as it’s reversible, I’ve used the wrong side for contrast). You could also use any medium weight fabric with a little bit of body: denim, linen, gabardine, leather or suede for example.

Let me know if you have any question about the patterns…

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Reina shirt pattern versions

I would like to start by thanking you all for the wonderful welcome you gave the new patterns yesterday! I’m so grateful and excited to show what you’ll make with them.

Today, we are going to see a little bit more details of the Reina shirt.
As I’ve said yesterday, I’ve been inspired by the delicate and romantic blouses of the late XIXth century, with their high collars, buttoned cuffs and lace inserts (see the moodboard on Pinterest). But I also wanted something that feels modern and can be worn with denims or a simple skirt, that’s why there are two versions of the Reina shirt pattern.

Reina shirt pattern view A zoom Reina shirt pattern view B side

With view A, it’s all about drama! Tie-collar, long and full sleeves gathered into contoured cuffs and of course all these lovely loops and buttons, this is such a romantic shirt! As for view B, it has a more casual feel to it with the small mandarin collar, short sleeves and pockets. You can even mix the different options to get the shirt you want.
This is not a difficult pattern, I guess an advanced beginner can easily make it, but if you need a little help, there will be a tutorial very soon…

The most important step is to choose the right fabric! You should look for light fabrics with drape such as batiste, silk, plumetis, rayon, crepe, chiffon…

Reina shirt pattern view A front Reina shirt pattern view B backReina shirt pattern versions
I made mine from cotton batiste from Les trouvailles d’Amandine in “eclipse” and “crystal gray” colors (the mother-of-pearl buttons are also from there). If you like these fabrics, you can find a “sewing box” with the pattern and a selection of fabrics in their shop.

See you tomorrow with the Safor skirt details..

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saler jacket with safor skirt and reina shirt

The day I release new patterns is always stressful, and today is no exception! During the last months, I’ve been working very hard on these 3 new patterns and I’m so happy (and a little bit anxious) to introduce you to the Reina shirt, the Safor skirt and the Saler jacket!

These 3 patterns have been designed as a mini collection: each piece can be worn individualy or as a complete outfit. Depending on the version and the fabric you choose, they can all be dressed-up or casual. I wanted classic pieces but with a twist, easy to wear on a daily basis or for a special occasion and that can be mixed with lots of other garments.

Reina shirt pattern versions

The Reina shirt was inspired by Victorian blouses, with loops fastenings and high cuffs. Wide, with a longer back and deep V-neckline, it can be worn with a skirt or pants quite easily.
There are two options: View A has a tie collar and long sleeves whereas View B is perfect for summer days with short sleeves, mandarin collar and small pockets.

Safor skirt pattern 2 versions

A faux-wrap skirt, the Safor skirt is very modern yet has a classic feel. With the yoke following the body curves and two lengths option, it’s versatile, elegant and confortable.

saler jacket pattern in white and kaki

saler jacket with safor skirt and reina shirt

Finally, the Saler jacket will be perfect all year-round and it just goes with everything. Classic tailored shape with princess seams, flap pockets and two pieces sleeves with button vent, it’s the perfect challenge for seamstresses.

You can find the Reina shirt, the Safor skirt and the Saler jacket in the shop!

I hope you’ll like these new patterns and I’ll be coming back during the week end and next week with details on each pattern.

Fabric credits: all fabrics are from Les Trouvailles d’Amandine.

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The new patterns are at the printer right now and I’m really looking forward to receive them!
In the mean time, I’ll show you the inspiration behind the “collection”.

Inspired by travel, the models are both chic and comfortable. Cruise or safari, which one is your style?

inspiration-new-sewing-paterns-2

inspiration-new-sewing-paterns-1

Moodboard: pinterestFabrics: les trouvailles d’Amandine
Can’t wait to release the collection!!!

 

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Today, I’ll share with you a tutorial I wrote for Craftsy on right-angle seams.
If you ever had to sew a right-angled seam, you know how difficult it can be to get a neat and flat corner without any pluckers. As a pattern designer, it’s always a challenge to explain these complex steps with easy-to-understand illustrations.
The Malvarosa dress has drop shoulders with right-angle seams, and I know that it’s the most feared step of an otherwise relatively easy pattern. But, fear this step no more!

Here are two different methods for stitching these right-angle seams: one you can use on normal fabrics and the other for more delicate and fraying fabrics.

Method 1: For “normal” fabric

 

Use this method if you have a normal fabric (not prone to fray excessively or very delicate). It’s the easiest one and will give you very nice results. But I would still recommend making a test version first
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-11. Here are your 2 pieces of fabric, right sides facing up. Seam allowances will depend of your pattern (usually 5/8″).
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-22. Pin the side together. As you can see, the top edges don’t meet: You should have about twice the seam allowance length
overlapping the corner.
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-33. Stitch until the apex point (where the seam allowances meet) using short stitches.
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-44. Carefully, clip the seam allowance up to the stitching line, (snip into just the bottom layer, the one with the angle in).
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-5how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-65. Pin the other sides together. You can see how it looks from both sides. Pivot the angle at the apex point so the edges meet and pin.
Stitch the other side until you reach the apex (make sure not to stitch over the fabic “fold”, the two lines of stitches will meet at the corner).
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-76. Press the seams to the outside. Here is the right side: if you see a little plucker like here, you can clip carefully a little bit closer to the stitches from the wrong side.

Method 2: For delicate fabrics

As you can see with the previous sewing method, we were clipping first into the seam allowances and then stitching very close to the edge. But with a delicate fabric or one fraying easily, it wouldn’t be possible to get a nice corner seam. So we’re going to use a piece of organza to create new seam allowances, similar to what you would do to sew gussets.
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-91. Pin a piece of organza over the inside angle, on the right side of the fabric. Make sure the apex point is covered (this is
where the seam allowances meet).
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-102. Stitch the organza around the angle, pivoting at the apex. Clip both layers diagonally into the corner, as close as possible
to the stitches.
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-113. Press the organza to the inside, folding it on the stitches line.
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-124. Pin the outer angle to the inner angle, using the piece of organza to lay both layers flat against each other. As you can
see, the organza seam allowances will allow you to stitch easily into the corner. Stitch, pivoting at the corner.
how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-13how-see-right-angle-seam-sewing-pattern-145. Press the seam allowances to the outside. From the right side and from the wrong side of the fabric.
Right-angle seams are mostly featured as style lines as they don’t usually give any shaping like a princess seam or a dart. But used as a gusset, they serve both purpose: interesting design lines and pattern making functionality. You should definitely give them a try!

 

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Here it is, the last viedo of the #AlamedaSewAlong!
In this video, you’ll see how to insert the invisible zipper, attach the lining with a fellstitch and stitch the hem with bias binding.

Watch directly on Youtube.
I hope you enjoyed the videos and the Sew-Along. Let me know if you have any questions and send me pictures of your Alameda dresses when you have finish!!!
Have a great week-end…
And see you next week with some big news (new pattern release!)…

 

 

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If you’re like me and don’t have a serger, you might want to use a cleaner finish than zig-zag stitches on your seam allowances. That’s why we’re going to see how to make french seams for the side and shoulder seams (and later on the sleeve seams) to get that nice and clean finishing touch.

 

I’ll see you on Wednesday for the sleeve part!

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I hope sewing the pin tucks was not too difficult. Remember that you can check the previous Sew-Along videos here.
Today, we’re going to see 2 tutorials:  first we’ll stitch the darts on the front bodice and join it to the yoke and then we’ll make the button placket. A little bit more work as the week-end is here!
FRONT BODICE

BUTTON PLACKET

 

I wish a very nice week-end! I’m going to enjoy the visit of my parents from France for the traditional festivities of Valencia, the Fallas.
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Congratulation to all of you! You’ve made amazing dresses!
So let’s start and show your beautiful creations:

 

cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-1cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-2
French seamstress, Charlotte from Hector&Celestine, made a lovely red and white Camí. Look at the fabric, isn’t it pretty? (I have the very same!).
cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-3Wow! Jen’s dress is amazing! Read more about it at her blog Tea for Two (she shares it with her twin sister, how cool is that?).

cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-4Kirsty’s gorgeous Liberty fabric looks so good. You can see more pictures of it here: Top notch.

cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-5 Alicia did a great job with her Camí, I love the colourful fabric. She blogs at Una Modista de Pacotilla.

cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-6Another bold fabric: Claire from I want to be a turtle made a beautiful bright Camí. Perfect to brighten the coming winter…
cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-7Elle went for a total vintage look and I love the contrast cuffs, collar and button placket. If you want to read more about her dress, go check her blog Busy Elle Bee: she’s made a very complete review of the Sew-Along.
cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-8cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-9Maider from Masustak eguzkitan made such a pretty dress, I had to include a detail picture of the fabric (I want the same).
cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-10Smaida’s winter version is very elegant. See more pictures of her dress on her blog SewMeow.
cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-11Lara from Dreaming of Avonlea made a shirt version from the Camí pattern. Isn’t it great?
 cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-12
Nathalie was a pattern tester but her beautiful dress never got shown on the blog. It deserves to be as it was the first ever dress she made! See more on her blog Made in Home.
Now, if your dress is not here, please send me an email with the picture (paulineyalice @ gmail.com) and I’ll add it!

And now the GIVEAWAY!

cami-sew-along-parade-pattern-13The lucky winner of the next pauline alice pattern is…………. JEN from Tea for Two!
As soon as the pattern is out, I’ll send it to you!

Thank to all of you for participating to the Sew-Along, I hope you had fun and that you enjoyed sewing the Camí dress pattern.

pauline-sewing-pattern

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I can now show you the Camí dress I made for the Sew-Along! I used a floral cotton fabric and a white cotton sateen for the contrasted collar and cuffs (that’s a look I saw on a Dolce & Gabanna dress and I thought I could try to make a modest replica).
Now I really looking forward to show all your pretty dresses on the 25th…
And I remind you that there will be one lucky winner of the next pattern during the giveaway!

 

my-camy-dress-sewing-pattern-1my-camy-dress-sewing-pattern-2my-camy-dress-sewing-pattern-3my-camy-dress-sewing-pattern-4

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Hello,
I am one day late for this post, sorry… I am working on the new pattern and got carried away.
But we still have to finish our Camí dress so let’s get to it.
You’ll need to hem your skirt.
Press and you’re ready to go!
HEMMING THE SKIRT

cami-sew-along-pattern-1

1.Because my fabric is busy and medium-weight, I’ll machine stitch the hem. You might prefer to use a blind hem stitch or hand-stitch the hem if you don’t want your hem to show.
First, baste a row of stitches 2 cm (6/8″) from the bottom edge.
cami-sew-along-pattern-2
2.Press the fabric with the basting line going inside.
cami-sew-along-pattern-3
3.Using the first fold as a guide, fold over again and press. Stitch at 2 cm (6/8″) from the border (if you have an edgestitching foot, now is the moment to use it to get a really straight sticthing line!). If you want to go back to previous step, all the Sew-Along post are here.
THE END!
I’ll show you my finished dress tomorrow.
Now it’s also time for you to take pictures of your Camí dress so we can all see your beautiful creations!
So get to your sewing machine and send me a picture with a link to your blog post (if you have one) by email (paulineyalice @ gmail . com) or post it on the flickr page.
And to get it even more exiting, I’ll be drawing one of you for a special prize. Submit your Camí dress and you’ll have a chance to win the new pauline alice pattern (coming out in November). You have until Thursday 24th of October to send your picture.
Have a great week!
 pauline-sewing-pattern
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It’s the final countdown! Tadadada Tadadada Tadadada Tadadadadada!
Sure that you have the song stuck in your head for the rest of the day now (at least I got it),  so it’s the perfect time to insert the zipper in our dress and start the final countdown of the Sew-Along: penultimate step!
I am going to show you how to insert a regular zipper. But if you prefer to have an invisible zipper, there are a lot of great tutorial on Youtube. The only difference would be to stitch the side seam after inserting the invisible zipper.
INSERT A REGULAR ZIPPER
cami-sew-along-zipper-pattern-1
1.Take the left side of the dress, pin the zipper opening right sides together and baste it (by hand or by machine). You might want to finish your seam allowances before depending of the finishing technic you are using (here, turned-and-stitched seams).

cami-sew-along-zipper-pattern-2

2.Press the zipper opening seams open.

cami-sew-along-zipper-pattern-33.If your zipper is too long, secure the teeth closed by stitching over them at the desired length and cut the zipper at least 3 cm longer (1,2″).

cami-sew-along-zipper-pattern-44.Place the zipper face down with the teeth on top of the seam allowances. Match the zipper top to the beginning of the zipper opening. Pin or baste in place. Make sure the zipper is well centered.

cami-sew-along-zipper-pattern-55.With the dress on the right side, stitch all around the zipper, using a regular zipper foot, following the basting line or the pins. When you are done, remove the bastings.
The last step will be to hem the dress so let’s see each other on Monday! When your dress is ready, don’t forget to send me a picture with a link to your blog or/and post for the virtual Catwalk we’ll be having the following week!
Get all the Sew-Along posts here.

pauline-sewing-pattern

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